Tag: Barry Lomax

The Palynology Specialist Group Meeting

Where: Linnean Society of London When: 22 November 2018 Organizer: Dr. Barry Lomax (University of Nottingham) For full program click link: LinnSoc-Palynology2018  

Shining a light on fossil sunshine

An international team of scientists have reconstructed the longest ever record of past sunshine using pollen trapped in lake sediments collected in Ghana, Africa. The study published today in Scientific Reports enables us to understand past changes in solar input to the global system…

Introducing the XPERT network

The Cross-disciplinary Palaeo-Environmental Research Training (XPERT) network commences in 2015. This international network will bring together early career researchers from five countries to learn new skills and develop collaborative projects. Training will be provided during a field school in Ecuador, and a summer school at…

PDRA: Past environmental and climate change in West Africa

Full time Post-Doctoral Research Associate, Temporary contract for 36 months, £27,854 – £36,298 Department of Environment, Earth & Ecosystems, Faculty of Science, The Open University Closing date : 25/04/2013 We are seeking a PDRA to study past climate and vegetation change in tropical West…

Funded PhD studentship: Tropical vegetation, environment and climate

Fully funded NERC PhD studentship tied to 500,000 years of solar irradiance, climate and vegetation changes project. To start October 2013 now avaliable with the Palaeoenvironmental Change Research Group. Title: Tropical vegetation, environment and climate: The present is the key to the past Supervisors: William D. Gosling (The…

500,000 years of solar irradiance, climate and vegetation changes

I am delighted to be able to report that the PCRG has recently obtained a NERC standard grant to investigate “500,000 years of solar irradiance, climate and vegetation changes” (NE/K005294/1). Investigators on the project are: myself (William Gosling, PI), Wes Fraser (now Oxford Brooks),…

Do plants wear sun-block?

A growing body of evidence suggests that plants alter their chemical composition in relation to the amount of incoming solar radiation (“insolation“) they are exposed to during life.  Chemical changes are induced in order to provide protection against the deleterious effects of ultraviolet (UV)…