British Ecological Society annual meeting 2016

bes_new_logo_2016The British Ecological Society (BES) annual meeting for 2016 has come to an end. It has seemed like a long week (and it is only Thursday) because it has been so action packed. For me it commenced on Sunday when I helped out with the introduction session for early career researchers (MSc, PhD and post-docs), and the marathon council meeting. I think the length, and intensity, of the council meeting highlighted the need for the structural review that our president, Sue Hartley, has just initiated. The main program commenced on Monday and has been mainly a mix of workshops, posters and talks, with a side order of special interest group meetings, carol singers, and a gala dinner.
I would like to highlight two of the scientific talks that stuck in my head in particular:

  1. Steven Sylvester “Shifting perspectives on natural ecosystems in the high Andes”; showed how remote regions of the high Andes may still contain the vestigaes of ‘pristine’ ecosystems dating from before human arrival, and
  2. Stefano Allesina “Higher-order interactions stabilize dynamics in a generalized rock-paper-scissors game”; showed (theoretically) how ecosystem complexity plays a role in ecosystem stability.

Nick-thumbAn excellent and exciting meeting was capped for me by my PhD student Nick Loughlin for being awarded the BES Public Engagement award! Well done Nick (@PalaeoNick).

REFERENCES

Sylvester, S.P., Sylvester, M.D.P.V. & Kessler, M. (2014) Inaccessible ledges as refuges for the natural vegetation of the high Andes. Journal of Vegetation Science 25, 1225-1234. DOI: 10.1111/jvs.12176

 

Enhancing fieldwork learning

cropped-banner5Enhancing Fieldwork Learning
Showcase 2016
University of Reading, Whiteknights Campus
12-13th September 2016

Sign up to attend this years showcase which will include:

  • BES-logo-general

    Supported by the British Ecological Society.

    Nocturnal camera trapping

  • Underwater camera work
  • Field microscopy
  • Drones in teaching and research.
  • Virtual fieldwork
  • Using e-books as lab notes
  • Linking to Citizen Science

Click here to sign up.

BES early career researcher grant writing workshop

BES-logo-generalEarly Career Researchers’ Grant Writing Workshop
7 November 2016
British Ecological Society, London
Our Early Career Working Group has organised a workshop on grant-writing for 30 early-career ecologists (early postdoctoral level) planning to submit an independent fellowship or grant proposal as named postdoc in the near future.
The workshop will include best practice and tailored support focused on converting a project idea into a grant or fellowship application. Participants will hear from ecologists in early and later career stages who are recipients of fellowships and experienced in reviewing & assessing applications, representing multiple research organisations and funding sources.
By the end of the workshop, delegates will have gained detailed insight into the grant writing process. and will leave feeling confident they have the knowledge and ability to submit an application.
Speakers:
Prof. Helen Roy (Centre for Ecology and Hydrology)
Dr Barbara Tigar (Liverpool Hope University)
Dr Iain Stott (University of Southern Denmark)
Dr Jennifer Rowntree (University of Manchester)
Dr Maria Olalla Lorenzo-Carballa (University of Coruna)
Programme:
– Plenaries from experienced grant recipients who are also experienced in reviewing & assessing applications
– Small discussion groups
– Activities to better understand the grant assessment/feedback process
– Opportunities to practice writing your lay summary and get feedback from mentors & peers
– Networking
– Lunch and refreshments
Cost:
£40 BES members
£55 non BES members
Register:
For guidance on how to book a ticket and to view the full programme, please see the document attached.
Link to the expression of interest form https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/BWJ67GF
Please see website for more info: http://bit.ly/2b1k7NT

BES annual meeting: Top talks

I am just back from a fabulous British Ecological Society (BES) annual meeting in Edinburgh. Both the city and the science were interesting and exciting. The Science Slam was certainly my highlight “fringe” event and I believe all the slams will be avaliable to view soon on the BES Youtube channel. But you can watch the winner, Rosie Woodroffe, now…

Of the many great science talks I would like to highlight just four here which I found particulalry interesting, by: Stephen Prentice (Queen’s University Belfast), Althea Davies (University of St. Andrews), Tom August (Cente for Ecology & Hydrology), and Kimberly Simpson (University of Sheffield).

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