Forest stability during the early and late Holocene in the igapo floodplains of the Rio Negro, northwestern Brazil

Tribute to Daniel Livingstone and Paul Colinvaux in Quaternary Research

  • Rodriguez-Zorro, P.A., Turcq, B., Cordeiro, R.C., Moreira, L.S., Costa, R.L., McMichael, C.H. & Behling, H. (2018) Forest stability during the early and late Holocene in the igapo floodplains of the Rio Negro, northwestern Brazil. Quaternary Research 89, 75-89. DOI: 10.1017/qua.2017.99

Amazonian coring isn’t boring

By Seringe Huisman (MSc Biological Sciences, Institute for Biodiversity & Ecosystem DynamicsUniversity of Amsterdam)

Hello all! You might have been wondering if I died in the middle of Amazonian nowhere, since I haven’t come back to writing a blog after we left for fieldwork in July. Given we were in an Amazonian region full of venomous snakes that could have been the case, but the good news is I just didn’t get around writing it because I got carried away by the findings of my project! We actually had a very successful field trip – apart from some minor issues like the lake swallowing equipment, sinking waist-high into the mud each step of our 7 hour long ‘trail’ to the lakes, and almost not getting my precious samples through airport security.

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Vegetation responses to late Holocene climate changes in an Andean forest

Tribute to Daniel Livingstone and Paul Colinvaux in Quaternary Research

  • Schiferl, J.D., Bush, M.B., Silman, M.R. & Urrego, D.H. (2018) Vegetation responses to late Holocene climate changes in an Andean forest. Quaternary Research 89, 60-74. DOI: 10.1017/qua.2017.64

Late Holocene forest contraction and fragmentation in central Africa

Tribute to Daniel Livingstone and Paul Colinvaux in Quaternary Research

  • Maley, J., Doumenge, C., Giresse, P., Mahe, G., Philippon, N., Hubau, W., Lokonda, M.O., Tshibamba, J.M. & Chepstow-Lusty, A. (2018) Late Holocene forest contraction and fragmentation in central Africa. Quaternary Research 89, 43-59. DOI: 10.1017/qua.2017.97

A >22,000 yr diatom record from the plateau of Zambia

Tribute to Daniel Livingstone and Paul Colinvaux in Quaternary Research

  • Haberyan, K.A. (2018) A >22,000 yr diatom record from the plateau of Zambia. Quaternary Research 89, 33-42. DOI: 10.1017/qua.2017.31

Lowland forest collapse and early human impacts at the end of the African Humid Period at Lake Edward, equatorial East Africa

Tribute to Daniel Livingstone and Paul Colinvaux in Quaternary Research

  • Ivory, S.J. & Russell, J. (2018) Lowland forest collapse and early human impacts at the end of the African Humid Period at Lake Edward, equatorial East Africa. Quaternary Research 89, 7-20. DOI: 10.1017/qua.2017.48

On the age and origin of Lake Ejagham, Cameroon, and its endemic fishes

Tribute to Daniel Livingstone and Paul Colinvaux in Quaternary Research

  • Curt Stager, J., Alton, K., Martin, C.H., King, D.T., Petruny, L.W., Wiltse, B. & Livingstone, D.A. (2018) On the age and origin of Lake Ejagham, Cameroon, and its endemic fishes. Quaternary Research 89, 21-32. DOI: 10.1017/qua.2017.37

Tribute to Daniel Livingstone and Paul Colinvaux

Mark Bush and I are proud to announce that a tribute to Prof. Daniel Livingston and Prof. Paul Colinvaux has recently been published in Quaternary Research. Dan and Paul were both pioneers of tropical pal(a)eoecology and both died in the spring of 2016 . To mark their passing Mark and I have guest edited ten new papers on palaeoecology drawn from researchers, and regions, of the tropics in which Dan and Paul worked (Bush & Gosling, 2018). We would like to thank Quaternary Research Senior Editor Derek Booth for giving us this opportunity and assisting greatly in the process of compiling the manuscripts. We would also like to thank all to contributing authors for their hard work and dedication to the project. We hope that you will enjoy reading the manuscripts and find them a fitting tribute to the life and work of these two great researchers.

Quaternary Research
Special Issue: Tribute to Daniel Livingstone and Paul Colinvaux
Volume 89 – Special Issue 1 – January 2018 Read More

The impact of people on islands

Since being appointed as an Associate Editor of Vegetation History & Archaeobotany last year I have the pleasure of working on a number of exciting and interesting manuscripts from the tropics. I am particularly delighted that the first of these (Astudillo, 2018) has now been published. I particularly liked this manuscript because of: (i) the close relationship that was shown between the historical and fossil records, and (ii) the clear signal shown from working on a island system. This linkage is something I have been thinking about in my own research on Mauritius recently (Gosling et al., 2017) and is, I believe, particularly valuable to do because it demonstrates the validity of techniques to track human activity when applied in contexts without historical documentation. The impact of people on the Galapagos is shown by Astudillo (2018) from investigation of multiple proxies (charcoal, phytoliths and macrofossils) to build up a comprehensive picture of human impacts on one of the most famous places for biodiversity on Earth. Hopefully this study is just the start of investigations into past human impacts on the Galapagos islands, and I hope that you enjoy reading the manuscript!

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Off to the tropics!!

On Jan 1, 2018 I (Crystal McMichael) get to ring in the New Year in the best way possible by heading off to the tropics to do fieldwork! And this time I get to take two students with me. Britte Heijink and Veerle Vink are both in the Biological Sciences MSc program (Ecology and Evolution track), and they are going to work on research projects that are associated with a recent grant that I was awarded through the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute CTFS-ForestGEO Research Grants Program.

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Job: Post-doctoral researcher in Palaeoecology

Job: Post-doctoral researcher in Neotropical Palaeoecology
Location: Institute for Biodiversity & Ecosystem Dynamics, University of Amsterdam
Duration: 3 years
Deadline for applications: 15 January 2018

We are seeking to recruit a Neotropical palaeoecologist to join the recently funded “The past peoples of Amazonia: Assessing ecological legacies” project (PI Dr. Crystal McMichael, funding NWO, based within the Department of Ecosystem & Landscape Dynamics). The project aims to reconstruct cultural histories from lake sediments in northwestern Amazonia, and link past human activities with modern ecological observations. The project involves analyzing microfossils (including pollen, phytoliths, and charcoal), and the development of a transfer function that estimates past human impacts in tropical forest systems.

We are particularly looking for a candidate with  expertise and experience, in:

  • Fieldwork in remote areas.
  • Neotropical pollen.
  • Quantitative analysis, including familiarity with R and Geographical Information Systems.
  • Academic publication.

For more details and how to apply click here.

Ecology & Evolution

Come study with us! New and improved Ecology & Evolution masters track within the MSc Biological Sciences at the University of Amsterdam

To find out more click here.